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A Dialogue with Industry, a Conversation between Cars

A Dialogue with Industry, a Conversation between Cars

Safety is our first priority here at the DOT.  It always has been; it always will be.  That's why today, it was my privilege to take part in events highlighting vehicle-to-vehicle communication (V2V) and vehicle automation technology innovations.

Companies like these are at the forefront of producing one of the most sought after technologies in transportation –the self-driving car.  In April, Delphi Automotive completed a 3,400 mile journey from California to New York with 99 percent of the drive taking place in fully automated mode.  The company has said before “Vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication are key to achieving Delphi’s vision of zero fatalities, zero accidents and zero injuries on the world's roadways.” 

We couldn't agree more with those goals.  Like Delphi, DOT is also committed to a world with zero traffic fatalities. 

And in light of that commitment, I'm proud to announce that DOT is accelerating our timetable on a proposed V2V rule that would require vehicle-to-vehicle equipment --technology that allows cars to “talk” to one another-- in all new vehicles.  V2V technology is a critical element of the connected automation that makes driverless cars as safe as possible.

Secretary Foxx at Delphi Automotive, photo by David Louie
Secretary Foxx at Delphi Automotive, photo by David Louie (@abc7david).
  • First, I have directed the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) to accelerate the timetable for its proposal to require vehicle-to-vehicle communications technology in new vehicles.
  • Second, we’re committing to rapid testing that would ensure life-saving V2V transmissions aren’t obstructed by radio interference. We stand ready to complete this testing, which many in Congress, the FCC, and industry are eager to complete within 12 months of receiving production-ready devices to test.  Combined, these two commitments will accelerate the introduction of V2V and vehicle-to-infrastructure systems, which are key components of the connected, automated future. 
  • Third, I’ve asked NHTSA to begin work aimed at ensuring our regulatory framework encourages the deployment of innovations demonstrated to increase traffic safety.

Together, these steps will support the current revolution in vehicle safety technologies while also making sure those technologies are safe.

Nurturing V2V development is just part of our larger effort to move from a 20th Century transportation model to a modern model that is safer, more efficient, more sustainable, and more economically productive.  That’s why we launched our Beyond Traffic draft framework, and why we encourage you to join the conversation about how we can build a 21st Century transportation system.

Innovations that make our roads and highways safer are essential to building that system. Today’s auto safety standards focus mostly on making millions of crashes each year more survivable. We want to move to a new era in which safety isn’t just about surviving crashes, but making sure that they never happen.

Government policy is essential to speeding up these innovations – V2V is just one example. And if we identify areas where policies, regulations, or statutes may prevent innovations from achieving their full safety potential, we will make changes when we have the authority to do so, and we will work with Congress where necessary to make sure life-saving technologies are deployed. 

Every successful innovation means potential lives saved.  So every delay is meaningful.  We are in a race against time, and it is critical that technologies like V2V make it onto our roadways as soon as possible.

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I am very disappointed with Secretary Foxx. Cozying up to big tech firms to ensure the deployment of their products despite any official testing in regards to their safety is not proper regulating. And of the apparent disregard for the economic impact autonomous vehicles will have on the members of our society who earn a living operating motor vehicles. Very, very disappointed.

I am very disappointed with Secretary Foxx. Cozying up to big tech firms to ensure the deployment of their products despite any official testing in regards to their safety is not proper regulating. And of the apparent disregard for the economic impact autonomous vehicles will have on the members of our society who earn a living operating motor vehicles. Very, very disappointed.

I am so happy most people wants SAFETY in vehicles now. Too bad SAFETY wasn't required before. I am now living with a disability from a HEAD-ON CAR CRASH. On August 29, 1987 I was on my way back to Orlando, FL where I attended University of Central Florida, from Melbourne, FL. I don't remember what happened. There was a van in front of us so I couldn't see there was a standard pick-up truck crossing over to our lane. I was the driver in my car with 1 passenger in the front seat and 2 passengers in the back seat. We had on our seat belts, thank goodness! From the impact of the crash left-side of my brain was bruised and my brain stem was twisted. My life changed. I now am living with TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. I have 2 nephews, Carlton is 10 and Braxton is 8. They won't be able to drive for at least 6 years. Now with the new technology for vehicles, my nephews will NEVER have the chance of having a HEAD-ON CAR CRASH! I would like promote SAFETY to those who are against the V2V and autonomous vehicles. If you have any questions or ideas, please let me know! kdorn321@gmail.com

so far yet so close can be done

I appreciate your concern for our safety but you can't rush this or our safety could be at risk. Please take the time to make sure the technology used to communicate is thoroughly encrypted and difficult to "hack". If things aren't moving fast enough, you could always institute better educational guidelines to drivers and make sure that they are tested to verify road safety knowledge and the capability to handle being behind the wheel instead of rushing technology that could end up being used maliciously. Educated drivers are safe drivers.

The standards should allow for older vehicles to be retro-fitted.
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