Public-Private Partnerships

Overview

Public private partnerships (P3s) are contractual agreements between a public agency and a private entity that allow for greater private participation in the delivery of projects. In transportation projects, this participation typically involves the private sector taking on additional project risks such as design, construction, finance, long-term operation, and traffic revenue. Learn more about P3s on the FHWA’s Center for Innovative Finance Support.

The Build America Bureau encourages the consideration of P3s in the development and delivery of transportation improvements. Early involvement of the private sector can bring innovation, efficiency, and capital to address complex transportation problems facing State and local governments. The Bureau provides information and expertise in the use of different P3 approaches, and provides TIFIA and RRIF loans, Private Activity Bonds (PABs), and INFRA Grants to facilitate P3 projects.

Have a P3 project in mind? Want to learn more about the Bureau’s P3 technical assistance opportunities? Contact us today.

Modal Resources

FHWA Center for Innovative Finance Support

The Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA’s) Center for Innovative Finance Support provides tools, expertise, and financing to help the transportation community explore and implement innovative strategies to deliver major highway investment projects.

FTA Private Sector Participation

The Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) Private Sector Participation website provides information on opportunities for private sector participation in public transportation, as well as resources for State and local governments interested in public-private partnerships.

MARAD StrongPorts Program

U.S. ports are critical links in the U.S. domestic and international trade supply-chain, serving as the hubs where goods we manufacture, grow, and buy are transferred between ocean going vessels, barges, trucks, trains and pipelines.The Maritime Administration’s StrongPorts Program is designed to support port infrastructure improvements across the United States, ensuring our ports are capable of meeting future freight transportation needs to support the American economy.  

Updated: Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Submit Feedback >