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In June, we published graphs showing past balances and projected balances for the two Highway Trust Fund accounts, the Highways Account and the Mass Transit Account.  Those graphs showed the Highways Account balance quickly approaching zero with the Mass Transit Account balance not far behind.

A month later, we've updated the data for both accounts to reflect June's activity.  I'm sorry to report that the situation has not really changed, and both accounts are dwindling fast.  In fact, we're nearing the threshold for the Highways Account where we have to institute cash management procedures...

Chart showing highway account balance hitting 0 by end of F.Y. 2015

Continue Reading DOT updates Highway Trust ››
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Today we released a set of Fact Sheets showing the condition of transportation in all 50 states. It's not a pretty picture.

Data on Massachusetts showing 52% of bridges in need of attention
Grim data from just one of the 50 fact sheets DOT released today.

A nation's infrastructure is its economic backbone. And you don't need a history book to know that a big part of America's success has long been our willingness to invest in our transportation system. In return, our ability to get supplies to manufacturers, goods to market, and people where they need to go has helped us thrive.

But we've been investing in that ability less and less.  And, as our willingness to invest has declined and transportation spending has decreased, it's no coincidence that —more and more—  Americans in every state are experiencing the frustration of poor road conditions and congestion.

Continue Reading We can't cross that ››
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Like most of our Nation’s major urban areas, New York City is experiencing growing pains. The Big Apple’s rising population means surging needs for freight and services, which have made congestion a common reality for the city’s more than 10 million daily commuters.

However, New York has long had a transportation ace in the hole —its geography and access to water.  New York City is positioned on a series of islands right in the middle of New York Harbor, one of the world’s largest natural harbors.  We at the Maritime Administration (MARAD) have always viewed the harbor as a common sense solution to the city’s transportation challenges, whether it’s using ferries to transport people or ships and barges to move freight, and that’s why we've been making moves to help New York fully leverage this asset. 

Floating containers on barges across the harbor has long been a reliable way to move cargo between New York and New Jersey —without adding to the dense traffic on the region's bridges. That’s why back in April, with MARAD's support, Secretary Foxx formally designated a cross-harbor barge service between Port Newark and Brooklyn as an Official American Marine Highway Project...

Chip Jaenichen at South Brooklyn Marine Terminal

Continue Reading Maritime Solutions for the ››
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Congress has a scant 24 days until America's surface transportation law expires and our Highway Trust Fund crosses a dangerously low threshold.  Although the current law wasn't really more than the 34th successive extension of previous law at pretty bare funding levels, even that is approaching a dead end.

If you're a Fast Lane reader, you know where I stand: this Congress should pass a long-term bill so States, regions, counties, and cities can plan more than 2 months ahead. And that bill should significantly increase investment in our Nation's roads, bridges, and transit systems so this country can continue to thrive.

We included those ideas and others --like faster project delivery so people can enjoy the benefits of transportation investments more quickly-- in the GROW AMERICA Act that we sent to Congress last March.  But I keep looking at the calendar and wondering what we have to do to get a proposal like GROW through Congress and to President Obama's desk for his signature.

The good news is, I am hardly alone.  Leaders across the country are adding their voices to this important campaign...

24 days until surface transportation law expires

Continue Reading Plenty of company in ››
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Yesterday, the Obama Administration invited communities to participate in the second round of Local Foods, Local Places, an initiative to build strong local food systems as part of strong local economies in rural communities.

Local Foods, Local Places provides direct technical support --agricultural, transportation, public health, environmental, and economic-- to local communities to help spur economic growth and improve the quality of life for all residents. 

At DOT, we support this initiative by working to ensure that local roads and transit services connect farmers, food businesses, markets, and residents...

Truck on rural bridge

Continue Reading Local Foods, Local Places ››
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U.S. metropolitan areas generate 90 percent of the nation's GDP, house nearly 85 percent of the population, and move 70 percent of freight value traded across the country. And, our cities are only expected to grow even more, absorbing an estimated 66 million more people in the next 30 years. That projected population growth means even more pressure on our aging transportation infrastructure. And that challenge keeps more than a few of America's mayors awake at night.

As Secretary Foxx has said before, mayors work at the ground level, where the rubber literally meets the road.

When the residents of our cities can't get where they need to go without crossing a structurally deficient bridge, that's a problem mayors need to solve.  When businesses can't get access to the deliveries, markets, customers, or employees they need to grow, that's a problem mayors need to solve.

But, when city planners and departments of transportation work to solve those problems and can't see beyond the next 2-month extension of federal transportation funding, that's a problem Congress needs to solve.  And when federal funding has remained essentially stagnant since 2009, struggling to keep up with minimal maintenance requirements, that is a problem Congress needs to solve.

Continue Reading U.S. Mayors call on ››
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On Monday, I had the pleasure of attending the phase-one ribbon cutting ceremony for one of our country’s most important and innovative infrastructure projects: the US 36 Express Lanes Project in Broomfield, Colorado. 

Our USDOT Beyond Traffic study tells us that, by 2045, there will be 70 million more people on our roadways.  The population in Colorado alone is expected to reach 10 million by that time. So, how do we prepare for such a crowded future?

To answer this question, Colorado is taking the lead with the US 36 Express Lanes Project.

Deputy Secretary mendez helps cut the ribbon

Continue Reading US 36 Express Lanes answer ››
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I thank Chairman Inhofe and Ranking Member Boxer for a good start on crafting a bipartisan six-year transportation bill. 

They, and members of the Senate Environment and Public Works committee, took action on an increasingly urgent crisis: our roads and highways across America are falling apart.  If we want to lead the world in doing business and quality of life, we need an aggressive change of course in both transportation policy and in resources invested.

The committee advanced the ball today toward policy and funding goals that the Administration put forth in the GROW AMERICA Act, but there is still much work to be done to address several important policy issues and to bring funding to a level that will adequately address maintenance backlogs and needed expansion.  We saw some of these critical issues raised as amendments to today’s bill. 

Unlike last year, when progress stopped at this point, I hope that the EPW committee’s work this week is just the beginning – not the end – of actions by Congress to address America’s critical transportation issues and bring funding in line with our country’s needs.

Continue Reading Secretary Foxx responds to ››
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The Federal Highway Administration’s oversight of the National Bridge Inspection Program (NBIP) has helped ensure the safety of America’s bridges for more than three decades.  A large part of this oversight depends on data collecting and reporting, which FHWA takes very seriously.

That’s why the agency recently announced it will begin collecting new data from state DOTs to monitor the nation's bridge conditions even more closely. As of April, state DOTs started providing the improved data to the NBIP.

The safety of our roads and bridges is a top DOT priority. But, in a situation like today where we have a tremendous repair backlog due to chronic underfunding and one in every four U.S. bridges needs some type of improvement, it's important to know where those limited funds are needed most.  Improving bridge data helps better identify where to dedicate resources to ensure that America's key bridges remain in good-enough condition to support the traveling public, businesses, and the economy...

Bridge Out sign

Continue Reading Bridge inspection program ››
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One of the most important jobs we have at DOT is to make sure rural Americans are connected --to each other; to schools, jobs, and medical care; to the 21st century global economy.  

Freight transportation, for example, is a huge concern for rural communities.  Farmers can't get their crops to market without it.  And with margins as tight as they are, the cost of that transportation can determine whether their crops are profitable.

And it’s not just freight transportation that makes a difference in the lives of rural Americans. When you're separated from your neighbors or the nearest town by miles, personal transportation matters.  Rural communities are often transit deserts, where those who can't drive are isolated from the basics --like groceries and doctors-- and from opportunities --like jobs and schools.

That’s why DOT sent GROW AMERICA, a long-term transportation bill that includes funding solutions for rural concerns, to Congress...

Rural road, South Carolina

Continue Reading Let's keep rural ››
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