Header for US Department of Transportation Blog

You are here

In the U.S. and beyond, natural gas is an ever-present source of energy that we rely on in our daily lives. We use natural gas to heat our homes during the winter, fuel our cooktops and bbq grills, and, sometimes, even power our vehicles. Most people know that it comes from within the earth, like other commonly used fossil fuels. But how does it travel from deep underground to the back of your stove?

The answer lies within the nation’s two million-plus mile gas pipeline network, which consists of gathering lines that move gas from production sites to central collection sites; transmission lines that transport gas at high pressures over long distances from producing to consuming regions in great volumes; and distribution lines that supply natural gas to local customers, like your house or apartment building. If adopted, the rule would add new assessment and repair criteria for gas transmission pipelines and expand safety standards to include previously unregulated gathering pipelines.

Continue Reading PHMSA Proposes a Refresh ››
Comments (0)

Last weekend, I traveled to South by Southwest to announce the seven city finalists of our Smart City Challenge, a competition to help one mid-sized U.S. city create a fully integrated, first-of-its-kind transportation network that uses data, technology and creativity to shape how people and goods move in the future.

Each of these finalists will receive $100,000 to build out their vision, including submitting budgets and expanding their proposals. The Department also plans to spend the next three months working with each city to develop their proposals and transform roadmaps into renderings.

Continue Reading Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs ››
Comments (0)

In January of last year, I issued a challenge to elected officials to make America’s streets safer for people walking and biking.  Since then, 243 cities and other local jurisdictions have signed up to the Mayors’ Challenge for Safer People and Safer Streets, with more signing up all the time. 

Today I am excited to announce the Mayors’ Challenge Awards to highlight the great work cities are doing, and stimulate further action on improving bicycle and pedestrian safety. Awards will be considered for work relating to the seven Challenge Activities, as well as for Ladders of Opportunity, and for active engagement in Challenge events. We will ask cities to submit a descriptive narrative about their successes since joining the Challenge and we will announce the winners at a Capstone event here in Washington, DC. We will invite winners to present at the Capstone, and to a special recognition event. Click here for more information about the awards and the selection process. 


Continue Reading Mayors’ Challenge Awards ››
Comments (0)

March is Women’s History Month, and, although we are always looking for innovative ways to get more women and girls interested in careers in transportation, this month allows us to focus more clearly on this goal.  

Since the founding of the United States women have played an integral role in the development and advancement of transportation. From wagons and horse carts to bicycles, automobiles, trucks, trains, ships, airplanes, and space shuttles, women have served as inventors, pilots, engineers, drivers, administrative professionals, conductors, and executives, and in a host of other vital occupations.


Continue Reading DOT Employees Celebrate ››
Comments (0)

The annual South by Southwest Festivals and Conferences (SXSW) in Austin, Texas, always attracts some of the most innovative thinkers in entertainment and technology. So there was no better place to hold a conversation with several of our government and industry partners on one of the most rapidly emerging and evolving sectors in aviation: unmanned aircraft systems.

The FAA's engagement with its interagency and industry partners is central to the safe integration of drones into our nation's airspace. Last fall, when we decided to create a registry for small unmanned aircraft, we brought together a diverse task force to develop recommendations for the online system. They met this challenge with an admirable willingness to come together to protect the safety of the airspace while fostering innovation in this emerging sector.

FAA Administrator Huerta speaking at South by Southwest event

Together, we created a simple tool that enables operators to register before they fly in just a few easy steps. The registry is now providing a valuable opportunity to educate hobbyists on safe flying practices. I was pleased to announce this week that 400,000 people have registered to fly.

Continue Reading Government and Industry ››
Comments (0)

For more than 20 years, State Safety Oversight Agencies (SSOAs) have served as the primary oversight agencies for rail fixed guideway public transportation systems within their State. During that time, the SSOAs responsibility has been to review and approve System Safety Program Plans, oversee accident investigation and reporting, and conduct triennial safety reviews. However, SSOAs lacked the appropriate enforcement authority, and had limited funding and staff to effectively carry out their critical mission of ensuring the safety of transit passengers and workers.
The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) Act amended Federal transit law by directing the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to establish a comprehensive public transportation safety program to improve the safety of our Nation's public transportation systems, which includes an enhanced State Safety Oversight Program. Today, FTA is proud to  announce the first of four safety regulations required by Congress  will be published in the Federal Register on March 16, 2016, and take effect 30 days later.

The State Safety Oversight Program final rule  (SSO rule) replaces existing regulations and significantly strengthens an SSOA’s authority to prevent and mitigate accidents and incidents on rail transit systems to help ensure the safety of riders and workers. Each SSOA is now required to have the enforcement authority, legal and financial independence from the agencies it oversees, and human resources necessary for overseeing the number, size, and complexity of the rail transit agencies within its jurisdiction. In addition, SSOAs must train and certify personnel responsible for performing safety oversight activities and will continue to conduct triennial audits of the safety programs established by each rail transit system. 

Continue Reading New FTA Final Rule ››
Comments (0)

This week, millions of Americans will wear green clothing and enjoy St. Patrick’s Day festivities across the country. Whether Irish or not, many say “Erin Go Bragh,” as tradition dictates.

But there is no tradition quite as important as getting home safely – and the safety performance measures we are unveiling this week in the Federal Register are part of a wide-ranging program to reduce highway deaths, including bicycle-pedestrian fatalities. By putting rigorous new standards in place, we are making safety an important part of an ambitious new performance management program. Safety is our top priority, and ensuring that states and large cities are setting benchmarks to which they will be held accountable is a step in the right direction.

As has been reported widely, roadway fatalities have increased nationwide. The reasons are many, but we can do a better job of reducing crashes – whether fatal or not – by updating our Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP). Major provisions involve requirements for all states to set safety targets and report on their progress toward achieving them. A performance-based approach, with improved data about roads and consistent definitions of serious injuries, will help increase roadway safety and set a higher standard for data-driven safety decision-making. These updates will also boost collaboration among our state and local road safety partners, and provide transparency for the American public. By requiring states to set and report on their safety targets, and provide greater consistency in the reporting of serious injuries, these rules will help save lives. 

Continue Reading FHWA Unveils New Safety ››
Comments (0)

Last December, we launched our Smart City Challenge, where we asked medium-sized cities to present us with ideas for how to create a fully integrated, first-of-its-kind transportation network that uses data, technology and creativity to shape how people and goods move in the future.

I’m proud to say that cities across the U.S. rose to meet our Challenge, and the response was overwhelming. By early February, we received applications from 78 cities that fully embraced the spirit of the Challenge and presented us with unique visions, partnerships, and blueprints for making their ideas into reality.

The seven winning cities are: Austin, TX; Columbus, OH; Denver, CO; Kansas City, MO; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland, OR; and San Francisco, CA. And on Saturday, I was joined by representatives of the finalists, including Austin Mayor Steve Adler, Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther, Kansas City Mayor Sly James, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, and Portland Mayor Charlie Hales, as well as private sector partners to announce the Smart Challenge City finalists.

Pictured:  Mayor Sly James (Kansas City), Mayor Andrew Ginther (Columbus), Mayor Bill Peduto (Pittsburgh), Mayors Steve Adler (Austin), Secretary Anthony Foxx, Mayor Michael Hancock (Denver), C), Mayor Charlie Hales (Portland) and Spencer Reeder of Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc.

You may have noticed that we listed seven cities, rather than what we originally announced, which was five. The truth is, after we had a chance to read through the tremendously impressive concepts and designs,  it became almost impossible to narrow it down. Ultimately we decided to invite two additional cities to the next round, to give a broader range of communities a chance at winning the ultimate prize.

Continue Reading Seven Smart City Challenge ››
Comments (0)

Once again, on March 13th, most Americans will return to daylight saving time at 2 a.m. and turn their clocks ahead one hour, giving them an additional hour of daylight in the evening.

Officially, daylight saving time is observed from the second Sunday in March to the First Sunday in November, with the nation returning to standard time later in the year.  Federal law specifies that those areas observing the time change must use these starting and ending dates.

That means, if you live anywhere in the U.S. except Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Marianas, and most of Arizona, you should set your clocks ahead one hour this weekend.

Graphic that says Don't forget to set your clock ahead one hour for Daylight Saving Time March 13 - Spring Forward!

Continue Reading Don't Forget: Daylight ››
Comments (0)

In January, at the North American International Auto Show, I unveiled a 10-year, $3.9 billion proposal in the President’s budget to advance autonomous vehicle technology. That same day, the Department released a series of steps we will take to pave the way for the development of these new vehicle technologies, including fully autonomous vehicles, in the safest way possible. 


Today, we’re announcing some important milestones towards reaching those goals. The first is that the U.S. DOT will hold two public hearings - one in Washington, D.C., and one in California – to hear directly from you about how to best integrate the safe operation of automated vehicles. 
The first meeting will take place April 8th in Washington; we plan to announce the date and location for the California session soon. Your opinion matters and I encourage everyone who is able to attend these hearings to stop by.  The feedback from these meetings will help the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) provide manufacturers with the rules of the road for how we expect automated vehicles to operate safely. 

Continue Reading Acting to Advance the ››
Comments (0)


Submit Feedback >